Hey, You Guys! It’s a Movie Roundup

Hey, You Guys! It’s a Movie Roundup

<!– P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } –> As Tears Go By ATGB is an early Wong Kar Wai film, and you can tell. It doesn’t have the slow, surreal feel of most of his movies. It’s a pretty basic Hong Kong gangster movie, but the performances are what carry it (those, and Andy Lau’s tiny, tiny shorts). Andy Lau plays a mid-level gangster who would probably have risen higher in the ranks if he wasn’t always trying to cover for his buddy, Fly. Fly is a fucking idiot who continually insults high-ranking members of other gangs, and gets his ass beat. Only the intervention of his BFF keeps him from getting murdered over and over. Everyone tells Andy Lau to dump this guy, but he and Fly have been friends for ages and he can’t seem to make himself get rid of him. It gets more complicated when Andy Lau’s cousin shows up unexpectedly. She has some vaguely-explained illness, and has come from her rural island home to Hong Kong for treatment, and expects to stay with Andy Lau. Of course they fall in love (this sounds kind of gross, but if your cousin looked like Maggie Cheung), and just when it seems Andy Lau might be able to get out of the thug life and live happily ever after, Fly gets in trouble again… ATGB is a predictable story, but it’s entertaining and not a little sad to watch Andy Lau’s hopes of a normal life spiral downward. Even the hideous 1990’s fashions they force Maggie Cheung into can’t diminish her beauty. If you don’t go into ATGB...
Guillermo del Toro to adapt Monster for HBO?

Guillermo del Toro to adapt Monster for HBO?

A little piece of my soul dies every time Guillermo del Toro announces another project that isn’t At the Mountains of Madness, but he keeps finding ways of keeping my sadness at bay. If del Toro is going to goof around with things other than shoggoths, he might as well keep doing shit like this: an HBO adaptation of Naoki Urasawa’s Monster. (h/t +Joe England) #gandg Embedded Link Guillermo Del Toro Is Hatching A ‘Monster’ Of A Series At HBO EXCLUSIVE: HBO and Guillermo del Toro are teaming on Monster, developing a potential series culled from a series of 18 volumes of Japanese Manga by...
Spike Lee’s Oldboy

Spike Lee’s Oldboy

I grudgingly admit that the first poster for Spike Lee’s version of Oldboy (I still can’t figure out if this is a remake or a new version of the original material, since most articles refer to it as a remake, but I have heard otherwise) looks pretty awesome. It comes out October 11th, so I guess we’ll find out for sure...
From Up on Poppy Hill Due in U.S. March 15th

From Up on Poppy Hill Due in U.S. March 15th

Studio Ghibli’s newest movie, “From Up on Poppy Hill”, is set to be released in the U.S. in about six weeks. It’s a touching coming-of-age story set in 1960’s Japan. Usually I can’t stand touching coming-of-age stories but for Ghibli I’ll give it a shot. Trailer plus more info The only thing that worries me is that it’s directed by Goro Miyazaki, he of the absolutely wretched “Tales From Earthsea”. I suppose I can be kind and say it wasn’t so much his direction but the horrible writing that ruined that movie, but honestly I’m not sure....
The Best Movie Ever Made in the History of Cinema. And I Mean it This Time.

The Best Movie Ever Made in the History of Cinema. And I Mean it This Time.

I’m not even going to say anything about this. Mostly because I am hyperventilating too hard to speak. Or type. Just…just…Del Toro, Idris Elba and Jax from Sons of Anarchy? AND MECHA? AND KAIJU? This just might be the most perfect movie ever made. If the world ends on December 21st I’m going to be fucking pissed because I didn’t get to see this movie....
Eiichi Yamamoto’s Kanashimi no Belladonna

Eiichi Yamamoto’s Kanashimi no Belladonna

(Note: I started a film blog the other day called The Daily Flick Pick. Not all the content from TDFP will be suitable for G&G, but when it is I’ll cross-post it here…)  Directed by Eiichi Yamamoto (Space Battleship Yamato), this 1973 animated oddity is both breathtakingly beautiful and profoundly disturbing. Based on a 19th century treatise on the history of witchcraft, Kanashimi no Belladonna (literally ‘Belladonna of Sadness’) was the third and final film released in Osamu Tezuka’s Animerama series. While the first two (One Thousand and One Nights, Cleopatra) are notable in their own right, Kanasnimi no Belladonna (the only of the three made without Tezuka’s direct oversight) is by far the most idiosyncratic. For his third Animerama outing Yamamoto eschewed traditional animation techniques, instead relying on lush static images that recall Aubrey Beardsley and Virginia Frances Sterrett. It’s also more violent than the other two – rape is a central theme of the film, and the fact that Yamamoto stylizes the sexualized violence has the effect of magnifying the horror rather than blunting it. Trigger warnings aside, Kanashimi no Belladonna is a fascinating – and little known – work. Link: Kanashimi no Belladonna (Wikipedia Entry) (Note: the first seven minutes or so of the linked video consists of trailers for the film. The actual movie doesn’t start...